Crossing My Legs!

NSV: Just for kicks and grins, I thought I’d try something at work today. As I was sitting in my chair before route time, talking with the other drivers, I decided to see if I could cross my legs. Haha! How long had it been since I’d been able to do THAT?!! What a fantastic feeling, to be able to sit there with my legs crossed just like a “normal” woman. LOL! Now for the SCALE victory: It was my intention to wait until the first of the month, but my hubby told me last night that he wanted me to weigh this morning. He said he had to work on November 1, and he wanted to know now! He didn’t force me to weigh or anything like that, but he planted that thought in my brain–and I was curious, too! Are you ready? I’m down another 4.6 pounds! I am down in the middle of the next ten pound increment! That means in 5.4 pounds I’ll be seeing ANOTHER new number in the tens column on my scale!!!!! WOOOOOO HOOOOOOO!!!!! To celebrate, I treated myself to a banana bread baked oatmeal for breakfast with shaved Lily’s dark chocolate sprinkled on top and a dollop of light whipped cream. Of course, I had planned to have that for breakfast anyway (Haha!), but it FELT like a celebration!

Inches Lost in My NECK!!

I still haven’t weighed recently (and won’t until the first of November), but do you ladies remember when I said I could wear shorter length chains now (and remember the one photo I took of myself wearing my mom’s necklace that I gave her when I was a teenager)? Okay, here is a visual for you. (It makes me cringe, but here’s a GGMS toast to transparency and honesty!)

I ran across an old picture of myself yesterday when a new Facebook friend found some of my old Christmas pictures and started liking them and commenting on them. I have lost at least thirty-five pounds, and it seems twenty-five of those have been in my NECK!!! My goodness. This is almost embarrassing to share, but, wow, I’m glad at least my neck is getting skinnier! Ha!!!! Notice the neckband in the first shirt. See how tight it was? Well, that shirt is a size larger than the shirt on the right, and, as you can see in the second photo, I have plenty of room in the neckband in the SMALLER shirt. It’s the same size my husband wears! It’s also embarrassing that that’s a positive thing, but it really is. Man! Please, God, don’t let me ever go back to that state of health! Thank You for Trim Healthy Mama!

THM faces

S Dinner, GO ROYALS!

S dinner: Sirloin steak, cooked in my swap and shop $2 Xpress Redi Set Go, side salad, with lettuce, celery, grape tomatoes, radishes, a sprinkle of cheddar chee017se, and ranch dressing, and steamed broccoli. The steaks hubby bought were extra large, so I’m having the other half of this one for lunch tomorrow! Guess what I’m having in three hours? A chocolate peanut butter shake! Mm. Then I’ll settle back and watch the Royals beat the Giants so they can come back and finish the series in KC.

010

 

More Hospital Stuff

I tried to Skype with Chelsea Lacen earlier, but I guess she was getting ready to be transported. Skype was giving me problems, so I tried calling her an hour or two later. (I fell asleep in my chair and kind of lost track of time.) She said the ambulance team was still in her room and she would call me when they left.

She called to tell me how the day went. She had her consultation today with another surgeon, Dr. Hebert. She said he was older than she had thought he might be. If he did the surgery, he wouldn’t do it for another three or four weeks because the wound is still wet. It has never changed from being a grade four wound. The HBO has helped, though. The bone is definitely covered now, and, instead of being five inches deep, it’s now three inches deep. It’s still not ready for surgery, according to Dr. Hebert (and apparently Dr. Colyer, her other surgeon).

Dr. Hebert said if he does the surgery now it won’t “take.” The wound is just too wet (which is good, though; it’s a healthy wound–if that makes sense), and there’s a yeast in the wound, too, because it’s wet, I guess. That is the reason they took her off the wound vac. It didn’t seem to be making any progress, and they thought it may be keeping the wound too wet.

She said IF he did the surgery, it would be performed at Truman West (some of us know how Chelsea feels about Truman West) since that will be his new hospital after October 31.

Right away he started talking about the amount of money that Kindred is having to spend to transport Chelsea back and forth to North Kansas City Hospital for hyperbaric oxygen treatments. He said IF he does the surgery he would prefer her to be transferred to Kindred South on Troost because they have an HBO unit on site, and none of us are crazy about the idea of Kindred South, either; it’s just a bad part of town. It’s a bad place to visit, let alone LIVE there.

Chelsea said if it’s going to take another month to do the surgery, anyway, she would just as soon stay with Dr. Colyer. She does not want to go to Truman West and she does not want to go to Kindred South.

She said, “And if I don’t get to come home in December….”

“Exactly,” I said, “No one says Christmas has to be on December 25. We can wait to have Christmas when you come home.”

Silence on her end.

“Are you okay?” I asked. Then I realized she was crying.

She pulled herself together quickly. “Oh, I know, I know. I told Tracy if I don’t get to come home in December, then so be it. That’s life.”

I’m her mom and this is frustrating ME–so I don’t even know how she’s dealing with all this. Her spirit and determination are to be commended. I can’t even imagine how she must be feeling. This has been a whole year out of her life. Because she was so sick, she missed a lot of Christmas last year: church, the lights, the stores, the shopping. She barely got to spend time with her family and was only here for four days, not to mention that she was so sick she hardly got to enjoy any of the food.

Chelsea told Tracy, the ambulance driver who has fast become her friend, that she will be determined like no one has ever seen determination to make this flap surgery successful.

Tomorrow she has peg-tube surgery at North Kansas City Hospital. The purpose of the peg tube is to allow protein to be fed directly into her stomach, via a tube. Dr, Collier had been opposed to the idea initially, saying that it wasn’t really good for her, but it’s better, apparently, than having the protein sent through her PICC line–which hasn’t been wildly successful, either. Even with the IV (and the daily protein shakes) her pre-albumen has not climbed above 19, and Dr. Colyer had said he wanted her protein to be at 20 or higher and stabilized for three weeks prior to surgery. He may have decided 19 is about as good as he’s going to get. Still, maybe the peg tube will help. She still has roughly a month before the flap surgery.

Her plans are to talk to Dr. Tadros and tell him she wants to stick with Dr. Colyer. She likes him, and, if the surgery won’t be for another month, anyway, what’s the point in switching now?

Please pray for her surgery tomorrow and that her wound will continue to improve before the flap surgery in a month. We want this thing healed and our daughter home! We pray for peace for Chelsea and guidance for her doctors and nursing staff.

Chelsea Update

Chelsea update: She went in for her surgery and they put her under the anesthesia. They ran the scope down her throat, but she woke up tubeless due to anatomical limitation, i.e., Dr. Eaker couldn’t find a good place to put the tube. He also took a biopsy of her small bowel. He wants to have her tested for Celiac Disease. Usually that’s something that is caught early on in life, but it is something that would cause protein not to “stick” in her body.

So she’s happy, in a way, but not. I mean, she’s glad not to be in pain from the surgery, although her throat is a bit sore, but she was hoping that the peg tube would aid in getting her protein up where it needs to be. The doctor sent orders for a G-tube (a feeding tube through the nose), but Amanda told Chelsea, “Well, that ain’t happening.” Chelsea was afraid someone was going to try to pressure her into getting that, but Amanda said, “No, we’re not allowed to do that. That constitutes abuse. If you don’t want something, you don’t have to have it. You have a say. Just like you don’t have to have Dr. Hebert if you don’t want.” They’re trying to get her set back up with Dr. Colyer (yes, it’s “Colyer”; I’ve been spelling it wrong).

For now, she will continue to get TPNs through the PICC line, and I guess she will know in about ten days what the biopsy from the bowel reveals, if anything.

A Day in the City

My dear hubby had to go to the optometrist today for his diabetes checkup, so we got to eat out today. His favorite place is Chili’s and he had just won $80 on some kind of fantasy football thing so that’s where we went.

We used to get the two-for-twenty deal; we both love the original chicken crispers, but I can no longer have the corn, the french fries or the breading on the chicken so I was scouring the menu for a viable substitution. Meanwhile Chuck was saying, “Make sure you get something you like.”

I had it narrowed down to the six-ounce sirloin and the all-you-can-eat soup and salad. I decided on the soup and salad. If I wanted chili instead of soup, it was eighty cents more. I’d never had Chili’s chili before and gave it a try, but it was a mistake. In fact, it tasted like my “mistake” chili (back when we were newly married)–in other words, before I knew how to cook. It was thick and nasty, and it had too much something in it. The texture was almost as if they had sent it through the blender. It reminded me of canned chili. I only had two small bites and couldn’t handle it, so our server brought me some enchilada soup instead. It had thin, crunchy strips of something in it, and, if I had known beforehand, I would have asked him to have them leave them out. All in all, it was a very good soup. It was the color of French salad dressing, probably loaded with cheese, and it was certainly loaded with yummy chicken.

All things considered it was a pretty healthy (and cheap) lunch. I took the croutons off the salad and wished I had thought to ask for them to hold the carrots. He brought me a second salad, and I DID ask for the croutons and carrots to be omitted. I told Chuck it was cheaper than fast food! The soup and salad only cost $6.99. Tortilla chips and salsa also came with it, but I only had them brought to the table for Chuck’s benefit; I didn’t touch them. Non scale victory? I think so!

Then my sweetie let me go to Costco to load up on THM stuff. He said, “Let me see the list! You better not spend a hundred and twenty-eight dollars again!” Reluctantly I handed him my list, written on the back of a Walmart receipt, and for a minute I thought he was going to wad it up and throw it away or stuff it into his pocket.

“Give that back to me!” I said. As he detoured to the bathroom, I started loading up my cart with stuff that I need, you know, baked-oatmeal type stuff: Fage Greek yogurt, egg whites and a big thing of Quaker old-fashioned rolled oats. (Crap! I forgot to get vanilla!) I proceeded to put other crucial items in my cart and turned the corner to see Chuckers standing at a Christmas candy display with a nice size tub of brightly wrapped, foil-covered chocolates in his hands. “Pffft,” I laughed to myself, shaking my head.

I got most of the stuff on my list, but didn’t find any reduced fat Philadelphia cream cheese or aluminum-free baking powder. Chuck sauntered up and placed a box of Healthy Choice fudge bars in my cart. I rolled my eyes at him and said, “Oh! Okay! As long as they’re ‘healthy choice’!”

He said, “I found some chocolate candy that looked pretty good.”

“I know,” I responded. “I saw you looking at it.”

“Was I drooling?” he asked.

“Well, it was pretty hard to see from behind, but, yes, I’m pretty sure you were drooling.”

As we left the checkout with our box of goodies, Chuck scoffed, “Ninety dollars and the only thing I’m seeing are ice cream bars.” LOL He’s a funny man.

“You’re only seeing ice cream bars because you have tunnel vision,” I responded. “I got lots of good stuff in here!” And I did, too! EZEKIEL BREAD! I finally found it! I can have a sandwich now! Or a piece of toast! My freezer is packed and ready for the next month at least!

I decided not to get the cottage cheese because it was 2%, and I’ve been getting 1%. Also, I don’t think it was that great of a price. I’ll bide my time and wait for Hiland to go on sale at the Pig. Or Belfonte. Or Best Choice. I’m not too picky.

We just settled in from our trip to the city. We’re waiting to hear from Chelsea to see if she’s back from her surgery and how it went. We tried to call her a little bit ago and didn’t get an answer. She may be resting.

Oh! My blood sugar has been 84 the last two nights at bedtime (and we eat late because Chuck worked the last two days), and I just took it again when we got home from the city. My blood sugar was 77, baby! I showed Chuck and he chuckled and said, “Can I get you some candy or something?” LOL

Now THAT’S a NSV: to have blood sugar consistently under 100! I can’t wait to see my doctor and get my labs back!

Oops! Guess what! It’s time for me to fix myself a smoothie!

Oh, and something else! We stopped by Super Center in Blue Springs on our way home and I found my aluminum-free baking powder! Now I can throw out my expired-in-2011 can of baking powder and start seeing some PUFF in my oatmeal! I also bought a bottle of Magnesium because, when all is said and done, I just want to be a “regular” girl. Isn’t that what we all want?

October 23, 2014 Chelsea Update

For those who have been praying, here is an update on my daughter,Chelsea Lacen:

I tried to Skype with Chelsea earlier, but I guess she was getting ready to be transported. Skype was giving me problems and dropped our call, so I tried calling her an hour or two later. (I fell asleep in my chair and kind of lost track of time.) She said the ambulance team was still in her room and she would call me when they left.

She called to tell me how the day went. She had her consultation today with another surgeon, Dr. Hebert. She said he was older than she had thought he would be. If he does the surgery, he won’t do it for another three or four weeks because the wound is still wet. It has never changed from being a grade four wound. The HBO has helped, though. The bone is definitely covered now, and, instead of being five inches deep, it’s now three inches deep. It’s still not ready for surgery, according to Dr. Hebert (and apparently Dr. Collier, her other surgeon).

Dr. Hebert said if he does the surgery now it won’t “take.” The wound is just too wet (which is good, though; it’s a healthy wound–if that makes sense), and there’s a yeast in the wound, too, because it’s wet, I guess. That is the reason they took her off the wound vac. It didn’t seem to be making any progress, and they thought it may be keeping the wound too wet.

She said IF he did the surgery, it would be performed at Truman West (some of us know how Chelsea feels about Truman West; the last time she had surgery there she had to share her room with a shackled and guarded convict) since that will be his new hospital after October 31.

Right away he started talking about the amount of money that Kindred is having to spend to transport Chelsea back and forth to North Kansas City Hospital for hyperbaric oxygen treatments. He said IF he does the surgery he would prefer her to be transferred to Kindred South on Troost because they have an HBO unit on site, and none of us are crazy about the idea of Kindred South, either; it’s just a bad part of town. It’s a bad place to visit, let alone LIVE there.

Chelsea said if it’s going to take another month to do the surgery, anyway, she would just as soon stay with Dr. Collier. She does not want to go to Truman West and she does not want to go to Kindred South.

She said, “And if I don’t get to come home in December….”

“Exactly,” I said, “No one says Christmas has to be on December 25. We can wait to have Christmas when you come home.”

Silence on her end.

“Are you okay?” I asked. Then I realized she was crying.

She pulled herself together quickly. “Oh, I know, I know. I told Tracy if I don’t get to come home in December, then so be it. That’s life.”

I’m her mom and this is frustrating ME–so I don’t even know how she’s dealing with all this. Her spirit and determination are to be commended. I can’t even imagine how she must be feeling. This has been a whole year out of her life. Because she was so sick, she missed a lot of Christmas last year: church, the lights, the stores, the shopping. She barely got to spend time with her family and was only here for four days, not to mention that she was so sick she hardly got to enjoy any of the food.

Chelsea told Tracy, the ambulance driver who has fast become her friend, that she will be determined like no one has ever seen determination to make this flap surgery successful.

Tomorrow she has peg-tube surgery at North Kansas City Hospital. The purpose of the peg tube is to allow protein to be fed directly into her stomach, via a tube. Dr, Collier had been opposed to the idea initially, saying that it wasn’t really good for her, but it’s better, apparently, than having the protein sent through her PICC line–which hasn’t been wildly successful, either. Even with the IV (and the daily protein shakes) her pre-albumen has not climbed above 19, and Dr. Collier had said he wanted her protein to be at 20 or higher and stabilized for three weeks prior to surgery. He may have decided 19 is about as good as he’s going to get. Still, maybe the peg tube will help. She still has roughly a month before the flap surgery.

Her plans are to talk to Dr. Tadros and tell him she wants to stick with Dr. Collier. She likes him, and, if the surgery won’t be for another month, anyway, what’s the point in switching now?

Please pray for her surgery tomorrow and that her wound will continue to improve before the flap surgery in a month. We want this thing healed and our daughter home! We pray for peace for Chelsea and guidance for her doctors and nursing staff.

Progress Report at Thirty-Five Pounds

I’m hesitant to post this because some of you ladies just blow me away with your before and after pictures. Keep in mind that I started out very fluffy (well, let’s just call it what it is, I’m fat…LOL), but, hey, I’m down at least thirty-five pounds! That’s progress! Having said that, when you’re extra fat like I am, sometimes a lot of weight has to be lost to be able to tell just a little difference–but I’m sharing anyway. LOL

When the picture on the left was taken we were on a family vacation to the Grand Canyon, Albuquerque, Amarillo, Texas and Colorado Springs. I was in such HORRIBLE shape that it was a struggle to walk out to the viewing area of the canyon. My plan had been to walk on the treadmill at home fifteen minutes a day before we left to build up my strength and endurance. Didn’t happen. I could not motivate myself to get on the treadmill.

We got there, and Chuck was pushing Chelsea’s wheelchair about fifty feet ahead of me; he has always been a fast walker. My son was lagging behind to keep pace with me. Finally, the anticipation got the better of him and, right before they got to where they could see the canyon, he caught up with them and they all turned to look at me with huge grins on their faces. Instantly they became my cheerleaders, “Come on, you’re almost here. You have to see this! It is so worth it!” Meanwhile, I was hot, sweaty and felt like I was about to die. I persevered and what a breathtaking sight awaited me!

When I went to see my doctor at the end of June, I knew something had to be done about my weight. I drive a school bus and DOT physical requirements are getting stricter. Before, I had been able to get a two-year renewal on my physical, but this year he only gave me a one-year because I’m on Metformin, a drug for diabetes. If I had been on insulin it would have been an automatic fail. Long story short, diabetes is a progressive disease and if I don’t shove it into reverse now I may be in danger of losing my job–and our HOUSE! We need two jobs to meet our financial responsibilities. We didn’t buy our house until later in life, and it was as if God had led us specifically to this house for my daughter’s needs. It has a wide open floor plan, double doors between the living room and dining room and dining room and family room. It has a wide hallway, and her room had included a walk-in closet that we renovated to become a wheelchair accessible bathroom.

I don’t know why I haven’t taken care of my health. Maybe part of me has always thought that I just couldn’t handle it if something happened to one of my kids or my husband while I was still here. It took me a long time to realize how very selfish that kind of thinking is. If I have a heart attack or stroke, who is going to be here to help my husband make house payments? Who will be here to help my daughter with her physical problems and limitations?

I haven’t been one to jump from one diet to another. I haven’t tried Atkins or Weight Watchers or Jenny Craig or NutriSystem or ANY diet at all, but I needed something. And I needed it fast. I saw on a post of a friend of mine who used to go to our church that she had lost fifty pounds. I asked her how she had done it, and she told me about Trim Healthy Mama. I asked Chuck about it and then ordered the book. Can you believe I STILL haven’t read the whole thing, but I’ve read some parts three and four times already.

Anyway, I can now say that I walk twenty minutes a day on the treadmill, and it’s not bad. I don’t RUN or anything like that, but I walk at a pretty good clip (for me)–2.6 miles per hour. I no longer feel like I’m going to die. I’m hoping the loss of more weight will help my feet, though, because my toes are still numb and even my feet are getting numb, too.

Sorry for the lengthy post, but I want to thank you all for your daily encouragement and photos of yourselves “before and after” (they keep me motivated!) and the recipes you graciously share! Thank you, also, again for your prayers for my daughter. She has said she may give THM a whirl when she gets home from the hospital.

Anyway, here I am before THM and DURING THM (a long way until “after THM”), but, by the grace of God, I will continue to make progress–one baked oatmeal and smoothie at a time!) and KEEP my job and get this diabetes turned around. If you made it to the end of this post, congratulations! Haha! And thank you! Thirty-five pounds, baby! At least! I won’t know exactly how many until the first of the month! Kristin, I haven’t forgotten our deal. If you don’t weigh until then, I won’t!

THM Before and During (35 pounds down!)

October 20, 2014 Chelsea Update

My daughter has been in the hospital for most of the year. She started getting night fevers in October of last year and was hospitalized by December 17. She was home for four days over Christmas and then had back-to-back surgeries on December 29 and 30.

It started with a few misdiagnosises and ended up being a fistula (an abscess in the rectal wall), then it was osteomyelitis (infection in the bone). She has had several infections, including C-diff, MRSA, VRE, pseudomonas. It seems like it has just been one thing after another.

I’m asking those of you who have half a minute or fifteen seconds or so to say a prayer for my daughter,¬†Chelsea Lacen. She received some disappointing (almost devastating) news this morning (actually it may have been early afternoon). Her surgeon decided he wanted to postpone the surgery (a flap surgery to cover the substantial wound that occurred when she had part of her infected tailbone removed and the following colostomy surgery) for another month. Her pre-albumen number has been nineteen for three weeks, but he has decided it should be even higher; initially he had told her twenty or above. She has been trying so hard to keep her numbers up, drinking protein shakes everyday and mixing them with whey protein powder; that’s not even taking into consideration that they are now giving her protein via her PICC line.

When Dr. Tadros came in to deliver the news to her, she started crying. She told me she almost made it through without breaking down, and, of course, she apologized, as she always does, when she loses the battle with her emotions; but he said, “No, no, that’s quite all right. We are still trying. We are going to get you a consult with another surgeon, a second opinion. We are going to make this happen.”

“I just wanted to be home by Christmas,” Chelsea sobbed.

Dr. Tadros said, “Hey, I want you to be home for Thanksgiving.”

“Well, I had no hopes of THAT happening,” Chelsea replied. She has tried not to have any unrealistic expectations.

“Yes, don’t bank on that, but I would LIKE you to be home by Thanksgiving.”

Now we don’t have a definite surgery date. Now we don’t have a definite SURGEON.

Chelsea messaged me to say, “Ugh. I’m in tears. lol”

I asked what was wrong, and she said she thought she was okay now and that we could Skype for a bit. She tried to be upbeat, to relay everything as it happened, exactly what was said, but then she started crying again. Do you know how hard it is not to cry when your child is so disappointed and crying? It’s hard, if not impossible. I didn’t do well. It has been such a hard year for her, and she has sailed through it famously, never complaining, always cheerful.

But the setbacks are hard. She wasn’t looking forward to the surgery, but she was looking forward to having it over with; and she was looking forward to being released on December 1–because that’s what they promised her.
People oughtn’t to promise things and then not make absolutely sure those things come about. Or maybe they shouldn’t promise things UNTIL they are certain those things will happen. Don’t they take into consideration what a letdown that would be? What a disappointment like that would do to a person?

We are STILL hoping to have her home by Christmas. Dr. Tadros seemed quite adamant that it WILL HAPPEN. For right now, though, things are kind of up in the air. We don’t know when the surgery will be or who will be performing it.

What a year. All prayers are appreciated. Still.

A bit of background: ¬†Chelsea was born with spina bifida and has had various problems with pressure sores through the years, but never a medical issue that has laid her as low as this one has. She has had shunt surgeries, although only a few, and a few years back she was hospitalized with H1-N1 (the swine flu), When she has pressure sores, they are slow-healing, so when Dr. James told us she would be healed from her December surgeries in a couple of months, I was dubious. I said, “She’s been battling this wound on the bottom of her foot for three years.” He replied, “Yes, but this is in her torso and she has better blood flow there.” I’m wondering if we were even talking about the same wound. She has her stoma, of course, on her stomach. Was he talking about that? Because this wound where they took out her tailbone is a pretty significant wound. After being released a couple of times and being admitted right back in because of climbing temperatures, it has been frustrating to be sure. Even the home health nurse said she felt unqualified to care for the wound.

She had had a third surgery to correct a twisted bowel that occurred during her second surgery. She became one very sick young lady during that and couldn’t keep anything down, of course, because she wasn’t having any “output” due to the twisted bowel.

She was transferred from Centerpoint to Kindred in January, I think, to recover. They sent her home on April 2, but she had to go back the middle of May because she just wasn’t doing well. Then they let her come home a couple of days before her 29th birthday, and we took a family vacation to Branson for just a couple of days. On our last day there, she was starting to get sick again and couldn’t eat anything when we stopped at Shoney’s to have the breakfast bar before we rode the ducks. It’s all very hard to remember. It’s been a whirlwind this year and a bit of a blur, but we had the wound vac on her at home. It was in such an awkward place that it was hard to get a good seal. It was just a bad time.

She wasn’t home long before she was readmitted to Kindred. I think it was the eleventh of July when she went back and she’s been there ever since. She has been having to undergo hyperbaric oxygen treatments five times a week, Monday through Friday, for ninety minutes a day. That was a bit of an ordeal starting out because Chelsea is extremely claustrophobic. The first few times they gave her Ativan, but she has determined to get herself through this in order to be healed. It has gotten better. Of course, it’s difficult to be in an oxygen chamber for ninety minutes (plus twenty more for the oxygen to reach the proper pressure and then return to the starting pressure after the treatment is over), but she looks at the bright side. It DOES break up her day and make the days go faster because she has to be transported every day by ambulance from one hospital to another. She has become friends with the ambulance staff.

Sorry to be so long-winded, but thought I would give you just a tiny bit of background. Believe me, it is involved. Chelsea has been such an inspiration to all who know her. Every Sunday someone comes up to me in church and talks about how she inspires them to be brave with their own aches and pains, and they talk about her sweet spirit and how she doesn’t complain or let things get her down. Of course, sometimes she DOES get down. For a month she was looking forward to a visit from out-of-state friends; then, a week before they were supposed to be there, she found out they weren’t going to be able to come. She didn’t blame them and knew it couldn’t be helped, but still she was extremely disappointed.

And now, another disappointment, this surgery setback. BUT it didn’t catch God by surprise. As one of you mentioned, maybe God wants another surgeon to do the surgery for some reason. We don’t know God’s plans. His thoughts are higher than ours. Of course, our trust is in Him, but sometimes the journey seems dark and the path twisted. Thanks for your prayers. They mean so much!

 

Long Day for Chelsea

Chelsea had a long day today. She got her HBO (hyperbaric oxygen treatment) done and also saw her surgeon. He told her he wants her protein called in next week, and if it’s still a 19 or better he will likely perform the surgery that same week. He said he will schedule it on a day when Chuck is off work, but it can’t be the last week of October because the doctor won’t be here then. I can take off, too, at least part of a day.

I know she’s excited to let the healing begin, but at the same time she is apprehensive because it will be a long, boring convalescence. She will have to lie on her side 24/7. She won’t be able to do anything, not even turn herself in bed. The nurses will have to come in and turn her. I only hope she will be able to see the television. Using her laptop will be difficult to be sure. At least she has Internet on her phone. We can be thankful for that.

Right now she is on an air mattress, but after her surgery she will be on a sand bed. I don’t know that much about them (actually, I don’t know ANYTHING about them), but apparently they’re superior when it comes to healing after a flap surgery.

Prayers for a successful surgery and healing are greatly appreciated.